DOMAINE MARQUIS D'ANGERVILLE

DOMAINE MARQUIS D'ANGERVILLE

VOLNAY
Owner:
Guillaume d'Angerville
Website
Guillaume d'Angerville runs Domaine Marquis d'Angerville with modernity but maintaining the essential values that have been passed by his predecessors: discipline, respect to the great terroirs, and humility, year after year. These values are reflected daily by great rigor in the conduct of work in the vineyard and in the control of the local wine. The first essential step to develop a great wine is to treat his vineyard well. This is why the area is controlled and the work is done only by his closest team, who know the vineyard and adheres to it’s philosophy.
DOMAINE MARQUIS D'ANGERVILLE

In 1804, Baron du Mesnil, sub-prefect of Autun, acquired the Clos des Ducs, a property located at "Vollenay" in Gold Coast, in the heart of the Côte de Beaune. On his death in 1888, Eugene du Mesnil, without direct heirs, gave the Clos des Ducs to his nephew and godson, Sem, Marquis of Angerville, at the age of 15 years. After dying in 1952, his son Jacques resumed the domain. Jacques of Angerville died prematurely in July 2003, after an entire life dedicated to the Burgundy and the greatest wines of Volnay. After his death, it was time for his family to step up and preserve the integrity of the domain. As a result, his son Guillaume resumed the field in 2003.
Guillaume d'Angerville runs Domaine Marquis d'Angerville, preserving the essential values that have been passed by his predecessors: discipline, respect to the great terroirs, humility in the surprises that nature reserve, vintage after vintage.

While all Jacques' wines display a trademark elegance, complexity and length due to the high incidence of limestone in the subsoil, the different exposures and topsoils created distinct expressions. For example, Clos des Ducs, the great d'Angerville monopole, enjoys the highest elevation, on a steep, chalky slope. The “Duc” is a always a wine of grand cru intensity, with an intoxicatingly mineral perfume of rose petals, cherry and redcurrant.

Jacques d’Angerville’s non-interventionist winemaking, learned from his father, allowed these fine terroirs to be fully expressed. As he told Allen Meadows, “I want to do as little as possible to the wine. I want low yields and no signature.” After complete destemming, fermentation lasted 10 to 12 days, with a 15 to 18-month élevage in largely used barrels.  To extract fine tannins, the cap was kept moist by twice-daily pump overs. Such methods not only broughtout the crus’ inherent nobility; they created wines of perfect balance and great aging ability.

Jacques D'Angerville's non-interventionist winemaking, learned from his father, allowed these fine terroirs to be fully expressed. As he told Allen Meadows, “I want to do as little as possible to the wine. I want low yields and no signature.”