DOMAINE LEFLAIVE

DOMAINE LEFLAIVE

PULIGNY-MONTRACHET
Owner:
Brice de la Morandière
Website
Lovers of great white Burgundy have known this estate for a long time, it produces some of the most pure and captivating examples of all the greatest white Burgundies. From 1990 onwards Anne-Claude Leflaive decided to convert the estate to biodynamic viticulture. Today, her decision has patently been vindicated, and the quality of the wines has never been so high.
DOMAINE LEFLAIVE

Domaine Leflaive lies in the commune of Puligny-Montrachet, ten kilometres south of Beaune, with some land also in the village of Blagny. Like its neighbour (Chassagne-Montrachet), the village of Puligny-Montrachet owes its reputation to the famous Montrachet vineyard, which produces the greatest dry white wine in the world. The Leflaive family has lived in Puligny-Montrachet since 1717. Domaine Leflaive as we know it today has existed since 1735 and was for the most part built up between 1905 and 1925 by Joseph Leflaive, a graduate of Ecole Polytechnique and one of the team who built the first French submarine.
The late Anne-Claude Leflaive ran Domaine Leflaive from 1994 until her death in 2015, with the help of Pierre Morey, the estate’s cellar-master who retired in 2008 and was replaced by Eric Rémy. Brice de la Morandiere, nephew of Anne-Claude Leflaive, has been appointed to succeed her as new managing director of Burgundy’s Domaine Leflaive.

It has large parcels of Chevalier-Montrachet (1.99 ha), Bâtard-Montrachet (1.91 ha) and Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet (1.15 ha) as well as 3 hectares of the Premier Cru Les Pucelles, 1.26 ha of the Premier Cru Les Folatières, 0.73 ha of the Premier Cru Les Combettes and the Premier Cru Les Clavoillons almost in its entirety (nearly five hectares), not forgetting 1.62 ha of the Meursault vineyard Sous le Dos d’Ane. Since acquiring two ouvrées of Montrachet (an ouvrée is 428 m²), Domaine Leflaive owns a part of each and every one of the Grand Cru vineyards in the commune of Puligny.

Once the crop is harvested it is straight away loaded into pneumatic presses, and fermentation takes place in casks (30% of them new). In the spring, once the malo-lactic fermentation has finished, the different wines are transferred to stainless-steel vats, in which they are left for several months. This gives the wines great finesse and also limits the necessity of filtration prior to bottling.