CHÂTEAU DE FARGUES

CHÂTEAU DE FARGUES

SAUTERNES
Owner:
Comte Alexandre de Lur Saluces
Manager:
Monsieur François Amirault (Manager), Comte Philippe de Lur Saluces (Winery representative)
Website
 
Château de Fargues produces a superlative Sauternes (sweet) that was not classified in 1855 for the simple reason that the property did not make any wine at the time. After more than 500 years, the owner is still the Lur-Saluces family, which also owned Yquem for more than two hundred years. Not surprisingly, the two wines are quite close in style, if only for the reason that both wines receive identical care and attention to detail in the vineyard and in the cellar.
CHÂTEAU DE FARGUES

Paradoxically, Château de Fargues has one of the shortest histories for producing sweet wine, but one of the longest of all the Sauternes châteaux. The château was built in 1306 by the Cardinal Raymond Guilhem, nephew of Bertrand de Goth, elected Pope Clement V in 1305. In 1472 Isabeau de Monferrand, heiress of Château de Fargues, married Pierre de Lur. The family name became Lur-Saluces after Jean de Lur married the daughter of the Marquis de Saluces in 1586. Today it is Alexandre de Lur-Saluces who is at the head of the property.
Wine production at the château only began in the nineteenth century. The first mention of it in the famed book on Bordeaux wines by Cocks and Feret is in 1893, and it concerns red wine. Throughout the early decades of the twentieth century, the size of the vineyard diminished. It was only around 1935 that Bertrand de Lur-Saluces, Alexandre’s uncle, planted white grapes. The first vintage of a Sauternes was 1943.

Today the property stretches over 170 hectares, but only fifteen of them are planted to vine on top of a mound near a pine forest to the east of the Fargues commune. The grape mix is 80% Semillon and 20% Sauvignon. There is a diversity of soil types here but in general the soil, like in great vineyards, is poor, composed of chalk and stony gravel with a sub-soil containing clay. The microclimate of Sauternes works its wonders here in the classic mould, but the harvest is on average 10 days later than Yquem. The production is tiny with yields even smaller than those at Yquem. All the recent vintages of the emerging 21st century have been particularly successful. The only problem remains the rarity of the wine because of the small production of only 20 000 bottles per year.
 

The Sauternes wine of Château de Fargues is richly endowed while remaining extremely well-balanced.